Main Line Kitchen Design
Call us at 610-510-2024

Main Line Kitchen Design Trends Blog

Paul talks to Wendy, a return caller that took much of Paul’s design advice from a previous call and is now calling in for advice on some final tweaks to her design. Paul explains why 33″ Lazy Susan cabinets are a bad design feature and solves much of Wendy’s design challenges by recommending that she use the absolute smallest cabinet that fits a standard single bowl sink. Surprisingly many professional kitchen designers are unaware of what that size sink cabinet this is, and what the advantages are in using that size are over a larger size cabinet. Paul also explains why 36″ high wall cabinets should be used in rooms with 8′ high ceilings.

coco thai bistro

Main Line Kitchen Design has over 30 contractors that we recommend to our customers free of charge.

These general contractors take over the day to day responsibilities of the renovation project once the construction work begins. By recommending contractors and not subbing out to them, as most kitchen showrooms and cabinet dealers do, Main Line Kitchen Design’s clients save 20 to 30% on their construction costs.

Bishop Framed Ultimate Box2

Paul talks to Sam, who like many podcast callers and people that write us on our blogs, is concerned about selecting the best cabinet brand for her kitchen. Paul explains why comparing kitchen cabinetry brands can be difficult and how pricing works at different cabinet dealers and showrooms. Paul also explains to Sam why the design of her kitchen is more important than the cabinet brand that she selects. Paul discusses with Sam and later with Felipe what makes a cabinet well constructed and what the difference is between framed and frameless cabinetry. Towards the end of the podcast, Paul and Felipe discuss incorporating pets into the design of a kitchen.

The most important part of a good kitchen designer’s job is to provide customers with constructive appraisals of the good and the bad features for any design they are considering. Because kitchen designers sell the cabinets, we have the added responsibility of ensuring that what we sell actually works and fits. This experience and knowledge frequently saves customers from devastating disappointment and design errors like mis-sized clearance spaces, and fewer people able to sit at a kitchen table or an island. These errors routinely appear in drawings by architects.

Paul talks to Olga who called in previously to get advice on her kitchen design. Olga talks about her bread making and gets Paul’s help getting the appliances and the countertop she needs worked into her kitchen design. Paul explains why you shouldn’t use a particular design feature just because you like it. Design elements and appliances need to work well in the design and fit. Olga’s original design, seen below, was too tight and left her without a kitchen table. In the revised kitchen design seating is comfortable and spaces actually work.

Paul talks with Jeremy who has a small kitchen in Manhattan New York. Maximizing the usable space in the apartment is discussed, not only for Jeremy’s kitchen, but also for his living room and bath. Jeremy plans on renting the apartment in the future and Paul talks about the do’s and don’ts when designing a kitchen for a rental property.

Paul talks with Michael who has a kitchen design just a little too tight. Or as Paul says “ten pounds of sausage in an eight pound wrapper.” Paul also talks about The IKEA Effect which is a common phycological delusion that all kitchen designers must face daily from their customers.

MLKD Mezes

Kitchen designers who work at larger cabinet dealers can sell millions of dollars in cabinetry a year and are paid well because of it. They are usually very experienced and good at their jobs. Designers that work for design and build firms or at home centers, such as Lowes and The Home Depot, are usually paid less then half what better cabinet dealerships pay.

Alice Kramden

Main Line Kitchen Design is hosting a short story contest. Entries should be very short stories. Preferably no more than one or two pages. The story should take place in a kitchen, or be about a kitchen, and can be true or fictional. The winning story will be posted on our website which is visited […]

Red Flags

Why do red flags go up when Main Line Kitchen Design receives an email like the one below?

If you would like to check out all of our kitchen design topics, please visit the Reference Library


  Reviews for Main Line Kitchen Design

69 customer reviews

Average rating:5

 
  Beyond Thrilled!
My husband and I finally decided to invest the time and...
by Alicia S on 10/11/2021
  Fabulous kitchen...
Paul, the owner of Main Line Kitchen Design, did a...
by Mimi M on 10/05/2021
  We were very happy...
Main Line Kitchen Design did a complete kitchen remodeling...
by Aaron & Andrea O on 09/28/2021
More Verified Reviews
Wordpress Development and PA SEO by IntuitSolutions